Dunkirk - Film Review

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Dunkirk - Film Review

Dunkirk is when Great Britain lost its innocence and had to look at themselves for support when Europe fell to Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Germany.

From the start of the film you get this sense of loneliness and on your own atmosphere. A force much more powerful than the British who were pushed up to the tip of the beaches of Northern France.

Dunkirk is where the British Army had to stand to board a handful of British Navy ships that tried to rescue as many British soldiers as possible.

Like many historical military disasters you feel for those young men who were left in a hopeless situation as they became sitting ducks as the German Luftwaffe (German Air Force) mowed them down, like skittles in a bowling alley.

There were nearly half a million soldiers that needed to be evacuated that the late British Wartime leader Sir Winston Churchill, called for the help of what became known as the ‘little ships and boats’ as many fisherman, people with luxury boats and even people who had the basic rowing boats, went to the French beach Dunkirk to rescue as many troops as possible.

The British are famed for their patience and desire to queue in an orderly fashion, which was captured as the British soldiers were desperately and nervously waiting to mount the ships and boats.

But when the British Air Force were trying to contain the German fighter planes from reaching the beach of Dunkirk , though once the dogfighting over The English Channel was concluded if the German fighter pilot won then they had a clear run to kill as many British soldiers as possible.

You also see the story from those that went to the call of duty and on one boat a young boy called George treats it as a day out to France, not realising the danger that presented them.

The film also captures the mental anguish from soldiers who wanted to seek sanctuary in order to survive just that little bit more until help arrived, but became targets in the process.

Despite the chaos, destruction and death 338, 226 British and French soldiers managed to board a ship or boat at the very least, to return to the shores of Great Britain, which against all the odds was considered a successful evacuation.

Though the French Army did hold-out in the streets of Dunkirk to halt the German advance onto the beaches of Dunkirk. This act of bravery and self-sacrifice should never be forgotten. Because most of the British Army that got back to Great Britain ended-up protecting the country and five years later returned to Northern France on D-Day, to defeat the enemy.

The British and French had lost, now the Battle was to survive until help arrived!”

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